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of 20% of iran's call for sanctions, the united states there is a problem that iran to want to negotiate for a position which has changed -- you talk about 20% -- they want sanctions to be lifted with them stopping 20%. the question is they are enriching. we said their right to enrich should be recognized and that would negate all the u.n. sanctions. the nuclear issue stems from u.n. security council issues. within the margins of this issue, there is room to change going forward. i think we may find that it is constrained by the fact that israel is still there. israel is not about to let go of its concerns. i think there has been a lack of dialogue. it would be good if the two sides could sit down together. they could start with this temple and hold discussions and feel of how each side can help each other. my advice for the u.s. diplomats would be to sit with them and say we are not going to talk about the nuclear issue, how is your family. there is the fact of just discussing. on the other side, there is the problem that it is not clear what the endgame is. we're calling on iran to sus
. but the u.s. has declined. the united states has never proposed iran a comprehensive package. never. my point is this. first, try at least once. i real hi don't care in iran whether we have a conservative or moderate president or reformist because i have been working for 16 years under the presidents and i know we did our utmost to get a good -- to bring the relation, to improve the relation with the u.s. and the u.s. always declined. therefore, this is the same policy during ahmadinajed. but they have better justification during ahmadinajed. they use the holocaust and all the these rhetorics which is very harmful for iran's national interests. my suggestion is this. any u.s. administration i hope after the election -- because we cannot talk before the election -- propose at least once after 33 years a comprehensive package including terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, peace process, israel, human rights, democracy, all these major points for the u.s. and iranians also they have their own shopping list. and the u.s. also should be prepared to address iranian concerns. if it failed,
romney the next president of the united states. now president obama clearly came into office during troubling times. he likes to remind us of that quite a bit. here's the problem -- he made things much worse. so knowing this, the president can't run on his record. it's a terrible record. so what does he have left? he's going to have to distort, divide, demagogue, talk about fear and anger, anything but what we actually did the last four years because it's a bad track record. now, here's what we are asking you to do -- we want to earn your support. we want to deserve victory. we want to show you if we put the right ideas in place by electing the right leaders,e with can get this country back on track again. we can get people back to work again. we can get the american dream intact again. now, the president was asked recently looking back these last four years, any mistakes made, any doubts or regrets? he said, yeah, i haven't communicated enough. i need to tell the american people a story. as if that's our problem? he needs to talk more and we need to be better listeners? ladies and
know one thing about him. he does not fail. let's hear it for the next president of the united states. [applause] >> thanks, sweetie. that's quite an introduction here. i got how many introductions tonight? anyone else want to offer an introduction? thank you. this really is a critical time for the country, and i think a time of choice. elections are always about choice. i think the choice is in more stark relief than most electrics. i think in part because of where the country is. i think when you have $16 trillion in debt, when you see places like europe facing fiscal calamity or crisis, while you recognize these are critical times, what you have in this country, 23 million americans out of work, 23 million. when half the kids coming out of college can't find work or work consistent with an education that includes college, think about that? this is america. what's happened? and so the president and i offered two very distinct paths. his path is one which has been not just spoken about, we've seen it. we don't have to guess what his path might look like or what he would do, because h
the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
are not going to t along with anyone, so why try to pacify them? england, the united states, get out of the united nations. i'm tired of hearing hate speeches from people from other countries condemning us. this is a united nations of hate. host: if you go to the united nations web site, it says -- what you think? caller: i think at the time it was probably a good thing, but i don't think they counted on the rise of communism from china and russia and on the muslims and i think the muslims are a big problem with the united nations right now and we should stop trying to pacify them. we have a wenow who seems to sit there and watched-- we have a president now who seems to sit there and watch it. all he has been doing is apologizing. they killed two of our soldiers in afghanistan and the apologized to them. when the embassy was attacked, it was the man who had the movie's iffault. these people hate us. host: here is this on twitter -- here's the washington post front page -- many remember last year when the palestinian leader's request for membership was denied, not something supported
that egypt receives from the united states and i'm sure libya receives money -- i don't know how much, but i'm sure it does. and the amount was greater because the imbass door from libya had help arab spring. i've never been supportive of the arab spring. i know the columnists and the "times" and elsewhere extol it. we're friends with people who i'm sure will turn time-out be hostile to us. it doesn't make any sense. why should anybody trust us in the future? i'm not talking about mubarak how we threw him under the bus. those were the background facts that caused me to react strongly. >> congressman, you are very much the beneficiary of a shift in jewish vote in your district of queens and brooklyn. do you think the events, the attacks will result in yet a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i do. and i think there's a little more to follow. the shift in the special election indicated the distrust of this administration. and it was clear we heard what he said. we heard what the administration say and people didn't believe it. and the message was sent loud and clear. and
conflict. >> this what you're talking about was imported from an nog from the united states. -- ngo from the united states. >> a more general point, i think if you look at public opinion polls, what you see is a discrepancy between the attitude people have toward the united states and the attitude against it as policy. there is no indication that outreach really buys an understanding or an acceptance of u.s. policy. they seemed to travel in different directions. they show these a totally different attitudes on the cultural level on the political level. let's get some more questions. 1, 2, and 3 back there. >> michael from the department of energy. i am curious as to your perspective about how likely it is the tensions you describe are likely to affect oil production in the near term, whether it is through outright destruction -- destruction or deterring foreign investment. thank you. >> the gentleman with the blue shirt. sorry about that. i did not see the person in the back. >> my question is more directed to mr. frederic. seeing similar dynamics in the yemen with regard to competing mi
steer america towards a fiscal cliff. we have voted 65 days this year in the united states senate. there are a number of things. you raise the one about the payroll tax cut, we haven't passed an appropriations bill this year. why is that? harry reid laid it out earlier in "the national journal." forget passing bills, the democrats want to pass the blame game. i see this. we haven't figured out if they are going to pay doctors next year. 30% cut. the president says he has extended the life of medicare, only if he lowers what they pay doctors who take care of doctors 30% and freezes that for the next 10 years. for somebody on medicare, they will have a difficult time finding a doctor to take care of them. host: it appears something fleeds to be done. your payroll tax conferee last year agreed to extend the payroll tax cut holiday for another year. are you in favor of doing so again? guest: i voted against the conference committee report. i don't think it's going to be extended this year. we are looking at tax rates going up. death tax coming back in a much more onerous way. there is
in the foreign service, he won friends to the united states in far-flung places. he made those people's hopes his own. during the revolution in libya, he risked his life to help protect the libyan people from a tyrant. he gave his life helping them build a better country. people loved to work with him. as he rose through the ranks, they loved to work forehand. he was known not only for his courage, but for his smile. goofy, but contagious. for his sense of fun and that california cool. in the days since the attack, so many libyans, including the ambassador, who is with us today, have expressed their sorrow and solidarity. one young woman, her head covered and her eyes haunted with sadness, held up a handwritten sign that said "thugs and killers do not represent a benghazi or islam." the president of the palestinian authority, who worked closely with chris sent me a letter of remembering his energy and integrity and deploring "an act of ugly terror." many others from across the middle east and africa have offered similar sentiments. this has been a difficult week for the state department's and for
, president of the united states of america. >> mr. president, mr. secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birt
an address by his excellency, felipe calderon, president of the united mexican states. . [no audio] [no audio] >> on behalf of the general assembly, i have the honor to welcome to the united nations, his excellency felipe calderon hinojosa, president of the united mexican state to address the assembly. [applause] >> send your president take -- -- mr. president and head of state and ladies and gentlemen -- out of conviction and as a result of history, mexico is a strategic ally of the united nations. we were one of the founding countries of the united nations and as a founding country, we fully share its fundamental precepts, the precepts of our great organization. for me, this will be the last time i will be attending as the president of mexico. it will be the last time i attended the general assembly of the united nations. over the past six years, my country has taken part in very different fora to pave the way for you and initiatives. we have endeavored to strengthen the u n and make it the main body for dialogue and peace and for security and for the application of international law and, i
to dissociate the united states from that hateful video that insulted the prophet of islam. he said that there are important rights of free speech under the first amendment and we have to protect those rights, and if the government a press free-speech, it makes the world a less free place. he also had a message for iran, that while we want to negotiate through diplomacy if possible, time is not unlimited. that was a warning to the iranian government, which has been obstreperous and very difficult to deal with. i think it was a very important speech the president gave in new york. host: how about mitt romney? can you assess from what you have heard and hear him write these past few months? is there a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encapsulate it? guest: i don't know if there is a romney doctrine yet. governor romney is a very smart, successful person. my guess is that it is not the issue he wants to emphasize in the campaign. once the campaign to be about the economy and the unemployment rate. it is a difficult position for a republican to be running against a democ
speaker of the house, john boehner. >> welcome. let me just say ohio has a great united states senator in rob portman. he's been my friend for about 25 years and i remember about 22 years ago telling rob he ought to leaf the white house and go home and get himself ready to run for congress. let me tell you what, he's done a great job on behalf of cincinnati and a great job on behalf of ohio and the country in all of his roles in public service. rob, keep up the great job. republicans were lucky enough to win the majority 18 months ago. we promised the american people that it would not be about us, it would be about the american people. we promised to listen to the american people and follow their will. that's for 18 straight months, we have focused on the economy and jobs every single day. and you know, while we've done all of this good work in the house and done what the people have asked us to do, harry reid has blocked everything we sent over there. this is why it's important we elect josh man del and harry reid back to nevada. the president made a lot of promises in his campaign. m
is it that the united states pays 22% of the bill and japan pays only 12% ? guest: china, i think the number is 3.1%. that is what is insane. if you add in the money they get from the one, it is much lower. host: in germany, they only have 80 million people, they pay 8%. guest: we are suckers. they know, our checkbooks are open. i have no problem giving $8 billion to the u.n. if i knew it was working. if i knew these people were solved and the problems of the world, i have no problem. the reality is, they are throwing the money away. we are acting as classic enablers. no different than somebody who is unable in a drug addict or a gambler. if it continued to give these people what they want without forcing behavior, what forces them to change their behavior? host: here is another excerpt. guest: the ivory coast was a former french colony. they had independence. they have had a number of major problems. a civil war raging on for years. the u.n. came in. host: you are trying to interview somebody. guest: trying to. the head of the un peacekeeping. host: let's watch a little bit. >> i grabbed my came
respect our common humanity. i have made it clear that the united states had nothing to do with this video. it is an insult to muslims, and everyone. we are the home to muslims worship across our country. we not only respect the freedom of religion, we have laws that protect individuals from being harmed because of how they look or what they believe. we understand why people take offense to this video because millions of our citizens are among them. host: more headlines following these speeches, "obama talks tough on mideast extremism." "uses addressed to regain the initiative on foreign policy." if you look at the front page of "the washington times" this , the right "the expected campaign advantage on foreign policy suddenly in doubt, the president portrayed the deaths of the americans in libya has inflamed tensions over an anti- islamic movie rather than tensions based on american policy in the middle east." from "the washington times," the headline says "romney, exchange for reform." "seeking to carve ou host: here is mitt romney at the clinton global initiative. [video clip] >> the pr
-- the world of nation-state, those independent units that are truly sovereign and do not depend or take orders from anywhere else. the west can no longer do what it assumed it could do for its citizens. it needs to reach out for help. so you have got this system living in an uneasy coexistence with this globalize the world, and you say, "are we losing power?" though the very nature of power is different now than it used to be. you all in your textbooks say, cassette and these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other" -- "these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other," but it is much more complicated now. >> i would add that the concept of what makes up national security has changed. it is a much broader field now. you have to deal with economic issues. you have to deal with cybersecurity. you have to deal with a world that is largely asymmetric. as we play it back on the 20th century, which was not that long ago, you almost yearn for the ordered ways of the 20th century. we had essentially a bipolar world, two different ideologie
. the united states drew a clear, red line. iran backed off. different lines can be drawn in the i iranian nuclear program. but to be credible, a line must be drawn first and foremost in one vital part of their program -- on their efforts to enrich uranium. let me explain why. any bomb consists of an explosive material and a mechanism to ignite it. the simplest example is fuse.der in and a you light the fuse and set off the gunpowder. the gunpowder is enriched uranium in regards to iran's nuclear program. the fuse is a detonator. for iran, amassing enough uranium is far more difficult than producing a nuclear fuse. for a country like iran, it takes many, many years to enrich uranium for a bomb. that requires thousands of center fuses spinning in tandem in big industrial plants. those are green plants are visible. they are still vulnerable. in contrast, iran could produce a record detonator, the fuse, in a lot less time. maybe under a year. maybe only a few months. the detonator can be made in a small workshop the size of the classroom. it might be difficult to find and target that workshop
. the assembly will hear now and address by barack obama, president of the united states of america. a request for a call to -- his recognize his excellency. [applause] on behalf of the general assembly, i am honored to welcome to the united nations, barack obama. and to invite him to address the assembly. >> mr. president, secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentlemen, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grand valley california. the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, he joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria. from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, a riding on a cargo ship. as america's representative, w
the ascension into the world trade association. she said the united states must normalize trade relations so american business can reap -- speakingrussia's in the new york times, this piece in the weekly review pointing out the democratic party realized one kind of history and it would like to realize another with hillary. it is time for a woman. both conventions there were ghosts of politics past, present, and teacher. next is he larry. caller: i have been watching this for -- ever since it started here. i have been paying close attention throughout my life. my parents were democrats. i have seen them, and i have seen -- i became an independent. i voted for the ban that would best do the job. well, in the last four years i have seen republicans cost the united states a downgrade adventure it's true -- in its credit rating. i have seen them block every opportunity to come to a budget conclusion. i have seen paul ryan and make statements that he knows are false. all through the whole scenario of the last four years. you would know he is lying about fax. as far as mitt romney goes, you're sorr
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
of the united states. >> find any speech from both the democratic and republican conventions online at the c-span video library. >> during the republican and democratic conventions, we're asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president, as part of this year's c-span student cam video documentary competition. in a short video, students will answer the question, what's the most important issue the president should consider in 2013? for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000, and there's $50,000 in total prizes available. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grade 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to student cam.org. >> i want c-span, c-span2 and the books portion of c-span, because i feel it's important to be knowledgeable about what's going on in the world, and i feel that c-span gives the most information about what's going on in specific subjects, where a lot of television doesn't do that. >> hillary pate watches c-span on comcast. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your
privilege as far as being a citizen of the united states to vote and be part of the process. that is all i have to say. host: frank newport, it sounded like from the comments last night by mitt romney that they were really focusing on from here on out approaching voters who had voted for obama in 2008 and looking to lure them to the romney campaign. is there any way that gallup will be checking that attempt? guest: absolutely straight -- absolutely. we track daily. for a republican to win, they have to pull back in some of those voters. if the same scenario happens this year that unfolded in 2008, obama is going to win again. republicans have two goals -- one is to activate the core republican voters and get them to turn out, which is easier for republicans and democrats, because republicans are more likely to vote. they have characteristics like age and education that make them more likely to vote. the second task is to pull down at 7% margin that obama had over mccain, so they have to come in to become a convert some of those people who went for obama to go to romney, or they were going
a movie. host: look at this and we'll get comments on it. >> it was april 20, 2009 and the united states was opening the antiracism conference in geneva, switzerland, it was designed as a forum to reach the u.n.'s moral authority to end racism and discrimination, strengthening human rights everywhere. racism is a denial of human rights, pure and simple. there comes a time in the course of human kind when we must stand firm on the fundamental principles that binds us. there comes a time to reamp our faith in fundamental human rights and dignity and worth of us all. >> it was only the second conference of its kind in the u.n. 60 year history and as the secretary general concluded his opening remarks the man of united nations delivered the keynote -- tapped to deliver the keynote address wait the wings. >> the time is now, ladies and gentlemen. >> who would it stph-b who would it be, the guiding light who could lead the conference toward achieving its vital goals, who better than this guy,? >> and now to the podium -- >> [applause] >> this is mahmoud ahmadinejad, president of iran. somethin
as proactive as it has been because there as been paralysis on the fiscal side in the united states. there really has not been any effort on the republican -- on the political side to do much about the job situation. the burden has fallen disproportionately on the central bank. with the too much government is the problem, that is a discussion we have been having since the beginning of time. host: unemployment by education level, 12% with those with high school education, with college, 6.6%. guest: people like to talk about the more education you have the less unemployment you have. unemployment has gone up for all of the groups. college graduates or not, people are struggling. you could have a large student loan and not find a job. host: we have a caller. go ahead. caller: how many of the jobs are jobs with which people can support themselves or their families? guest: you make a fair point. the unemployment rate is one measure of unemployment. there is also a measure that tries to take into account people who are working part time, but would rather be working full time. if you inclu
things that is not a premarket industry in the united states because regardless of whether we have the information as to the optimus and effectiveness of a hospital or a physician problem -- or a physician, our health care provider networks that we are allowed to use are dictated by the insurance companies. a lot of the discussion about health care in the united states, people fail to discuss the role of the insurance companies and in network and out of network providers. i would like for you to comment on a world of our employers and large insurance companies play in directing where we get care. oftentimes, we are not allowed to get hair -- get care at, say, a university hospital or a teaching hospital regardless of our condition since solely because the out of pocket expenses will be way too high for a person to report getting the best care, even though it exists. guest: in my book and "and accountable," i share the reasons why it patient often decides to come to, particular hospital. their mother was treated there, the party was easy. if people are choosing a hospital based on t
of the united states, you can get in touch with us via social media, twitter, and the address there # csspan wa. the facebook.com/c-span or journal@c-span.org. this is an editorial, a piece in "the washington post" with the headline -- "after the party is over." he's talking about what he saw in the republican convention. he says conventions can be memorable events. they're known to energize the party faithful. they can convert never heard-of, barack obama into celebrities. modern day political conventions produce a steady stream of informercial, rather, during primetime all without paying for coverage. conventions have their pitfalls. these affairs have, on occasion, slipped off message, producing sometimes unanticipated adverse events. the violent clashes between police and protesters at the 1968 democratic convention nearly overshadowed the political rough housing on the convention floor. word of this week's incident, rather, in tampa in which two republican guests reportedly threw peanuts at a black cnn camerawoman saying, quote, this is how we feed animals is spreading like wild fire among
study. >> madam chairman, a delegate, i accept your nomination for the president of the united states. host: president barack obama last night at the democratic national convention in charlotte, north carolina, accepting his party's nomination to run for president for the second time, a second term as 44th president of the united states. good morning and welcome. we will spend the first 40 minutes getting your reaction to the president's speech and what you saw last night at the convention. the numbers to call -- if you have called in the last 30 days, give others a chance. and be sure to mute your television or radio. you can also reach us on twitter. e-mails are welcome, too. and you can find us on facebook. we will read some of those po sts. once again, the morning and welcome. we will get to your phone calls in a moment. somes how it is playing in of the headlines across the country this morning -- and in the washington post -- and in the wall street journal -- lots more coming up. let's get to your phone calls. brian is waiting on our independent line. what did you hear last nigh
if she cannot have it hamburger at woolworth, she can be the president of the united states if she wanted to be and she becomes the secretary of state. [applause] yes, yes. yes. yes, america has a way of making the impossible seemed inevitable in retrospect but we know it was never inevitable. it took leadership. and it occurs. and it's a belief that our values. mitt romney and paul ryan have the integrity and the experience and the vision to lead us. they know who we are. they know who we want to be. they know who we are in the world and what we offer. that is why this is a moment of consequence. because it just has to be that the most compassionate country on the face of the earth will continue to be the most powerful and that begins -- beacon for prosperity and the party across the world. god bless you and god bless this extraordinary country. the united states of america. >> from the state of new mexico, the first hispanic female governor in the history of the united states, please welcome governor susana martinez. . brian butler, president of lgbt democrat of north carolina's discuss
-- but effectively working with all these things is consolidation and renew all the reforming the united states and strengthening our infrastructure. if america gets its act together, especially with respect to the chinese, their respect success. if we are successful, and we will have a lot of influence. i would not said let's forget the world, but look at what we can do to advance our competitive position. host: talking about secretary clinton costs travel to china and u.s.-china relations. thank you. tomorrow, our national affairs columnist and the author of "who is counting?" 7:45 a.m. us at a 30 a.m., ala -- at 8:30 a.m., alan comles. and then aid to egypt in their transition to democracy. your calls starting tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. thank you for joining us. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> june is for the presidential debates live on c-span. next, democrats discussed the 2012 election. first, pollster dole ben sun -- bolstered joel benenson. then nancy pelosi and then gene sperling. >> so how do students chea
be accurately described as young. >> thank you so much. there is no organization in the united states that is better at serving as a forum for the principal legal issues of the day. i have been asked to comment as well on the voting rights and same-sex marriage issues. she has done such a good job in describing these cases. the two points i would make about same-sex and voting rights act cases is why would the justices get involved because these cases are not on the docket. the court family takes only one out of 100 cases. but doma has been invalidated by a federal court of appeals. if we're going to strike down a federal statute, that is our job, the supreme court's job. the voting rights act cases, several of them come on appeal. generally, you have to ask the supreme court to grant review in your case. but there are tiny slivers of cases in the united states code that allow them to go to the supreme court could but the voting rights cases they almost have to take. they suggested very serious concerns about the constitutionality of section 5. they have a lot of interest in this issu
speech he would say the united states was the only country on earth where we put our hands over our hearts when we sing our national anthem, which was quickly disproved by just looking on youtube. people around the world going like this and singing their national anthem. he dropped at the very next day. he never said it again. >> he paid the price. >> maybe. >> i would say that is an example of actually changing behavior, which i think happens rarely and in small increments. >> i think the other thing we were talking about before the panel with brendan, the other thing we do not know, how many conversations are going on with campaign message people, with people making ads, with speechwriters, they are talking about wording. how often are they saying, if we say that, the fact checkers will get us? i suspect that is happening a lot. the only evidence i have of that is a column written by connie schultz, who is married to sherrod brown, who says that happens in the brown campaign. i suspect that is happening in many campaigns. there is so much fact checking going on, not just with our
if mr. romney going to be president of the united states, it's a mistake. this country will be done, done, done. >> host: show you a headline from the washington examiner today. it's an a.p. story. but the headline says obama trying to make a case for sticking with him. they write here julie pace does -- don't expect president obama to try to reinvent himself next week. instead, he and a slew of defenders will seek to convince voters to stick on the president they know rather than gamble on someone they knew. a challenging task that most say is headed in the wrong direction. that's the washington examiner. another paper from north carolina this morning, the sunday news and observer. political speeches fail to sway the beleaguered middle class. north carolina having one of the higher unemployment rates in the country as far as the states go. we'll learn more about the state coming up. >> caller: i would like to thank my previous caller. congress on both sides has been the problem for 40 years. and they've got 10% approval rating. i think they're the ones that should go. both parties,
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